As I went a-walking one evening in spring
To hear the birds whistle, sweet nightingales to sing
I heard a fair damsel a-making sad moan,
For I, too, am a stranger, and far from my home.

I stepped up beside her, I made a longee,
I begged her forgiveness for being so free;

“I pitied your sorrow, hearing your sad moan,
For I, too, am a stranger, and far from my home.

“I would ask you one question, young man,” she did say, “Now, what is the cause of your coming this way;

Who are your kindred, and why do you roam,
Why are you a stranger, and far from your home?”

“To you, my pretty fair maid, the truth I will tell, When I am at home, in New Jersey I dwell;

It was my misfortune in love to fall prone,
Which caused me to wander a long way from home.

The lads of New Jersey are roving young blades, They take great delight in deceiving young maids;

They will kiss them and court them and call them their own, When perhaps they have a sweetheart a-mourning at home.

I would ask you one question, fair maiden,” said he, “If ever you marry, will you marry me?

I will be your protector in the desert alone, For I am a stranger and far from my home.

I will build my love a castle in some pleasant town, Where lords, dukes or nobles can ne’er pull it down;

And if anyone asks you why you live alone,
Tell them you are a stranger, and far from your home.”