The Banks of Inverness

As I walked out one morning down by the riverside,
To hear the small birds singing
and to watch the waters glide,
There I espied a fair one all in her morning dress.
"Oh, a sailor gay," I heard her say on the banks of Inverness.

I stepped up to this fair one, I steered my course that way,
And finding her my own true love, I unto her did say,
“Are you in love, my fair one?” Modestly she answered, “Yes,
To a sailor gay who is far away on the banks of Inverness.”
I says, “My pretty fair one, what was your true love’s name?”
“’Twas William, and the mark he wore right well I know the same.
‘Twas on his little finger. May God my sailor bless,
For a plow boy once was William on the banks of Inverness.”
I says, “My pretty fair one, your love you’ll see no more,
For he is bound in irons strong all on some Turkish shore.”
“Oh, then,” said she, “I’ll wander, I’ll double my distress.”
And in despair she tore her hair on the banks of Inverness.
Long time I gazed upon her, no longer could I stand,
Showed her my little finger and the mark on my right hand.
She says, “I’ve gold and silver, take off that tarry dress
And put on those true blue trousers on the banks of Inverness.”
To church they then did hasten and married were with speed.
In sweet content their days are spent and happiness indeed.
Young sailors seek their company and in their lot rejoice.
God bless the lot that rules their cot on the banks of Inverness.

Banks of Inverness, The-1